Lincs park residents in clover as their honey bees deliver

Local resident Malcolm Gladwin (above) and his colleague Allen help to tend the hives and harvest the honey

THERE’S A BIG BUZZ among residents at The Elms retirement park in Lincolnshire after they enjoyed the first taste of honey from their new neighbours.

Thousands of endangered honey bees are now installed in six hives which occupy a quiet wooded area in the grounds of the park.

And this month, they delivered their first batch of honey and bees wax blocks which will help raise funds for the residents’ mini-bus appeal.

Sales of honey will help keep the park’s minibus on the road

The family-run park’s director Tracey Coulson said that everyone who had sampled the honey had declared it totally delicious:

“Best of all, we know it has been produced from the nectar of all wild flowers we have at The Elms, and from the blooms which residents grow in their gardens,” said Tracey.

“We decided to provide homes to the honey bees because their numbers are in decline, possibly due to climate change and the lack of the flowers on which they need to forage.

“Here we can offer them the sweet life in sixty acres of countryside which are virtually free of pesticides and fertilisers associated with intensive farming.

“Bees produce up to three times as much honey as they need, so they don’t miss what’s taken – and the wax has many uses, including lip balm, body butter and candles.

“Residents here are thrilled that the bees have settled in so well, and we are selling jars of honey and wax blocks both on the park and in the local community.

The hives are located in a quiet corner of the park’s grounds

“Every penny of the profits will go to the fundraising appeal run by residents to keep their mini-bus on the road,” added Tracey.

The 16-seat vehicle provides regular outings, expeditions and shopping trips for occupiers of the 340 park homes at The Elms, all of whom are in or near retirement.

The park’s hives are the latest in a long list of schemes to help protect the natural world, and which have won the park a number of top awards for environmental care.

“Residents here take as much pride as we do in trying to protect this beautiful corner of Lincolnshire and its abundant wildlife,” said Tracey.

“Seeing our natural surroundings flourish is its own reward – but freshly made bread spread thick with our own glorious honey is definitely a bonus!”

There is more information about The Elms, which has been owned by Tracey’s Kinch family for over 35 years, on the park’s website at www.elmsretirementpark.co.uk

Share