Pure nectar: Cumbria park cracks open its bee-friendly brew

Wild about real ale: Henry Wild with his park's new beer which will boost funds for the British Beekeepers Association

Wild about real ale: Henry Wild with his park’s new beer which will boost funds for the British Beekeepers Association

Real-ale lovers are raising their glasses to both hops and honey bees this summer at Skelwith Fold caravan park in Ambleside, Cumbria.

That’s because the family-run business has launched its own craft brewery beer, with every bottle benefitting the UK’s largest honey bee charity.

The park’s Wild Ales will help the British Beekeepers Association make younger people more aware of the importance of halting the decline of Britain’s bee population.

The beer is available both at Skelwith Fold, voted Lakeland’s top holiday park in last year’s Cumbria Tourism Awards, and at its sister-park Moss Wood near Lancaster.

Nectar-rich wild flowers abound in Skelwith Fold's 130 acres

Nectar-rich wild flowers abound in Skelwith Fold’s 130 acres

The bee charity will receive a donation from every bottle sold, and according to director Henry Wild, thirsty guests have already given a thumbs-up to the hop-rich ale.

The charity’s funding boost, hopes Henry, will run into hundreds of pounds each year – and will complement the parks’ existing commitment to help honey bees thrive.

Moss Wood is home to over 100,000 of the insects after hives were installed on the park this spring, and a 3000 square-foot wildflower wilderness created.

Meanwhile, Skelwith Fold’s 130 acres are also a haven for nectar-rich wild flowers, encouraged by a ban by the park on the use of harmful chemicals and pesticides.

Both of the family’s holiday parks have been long-time holders of the David Bellamy Conservation Award at its top gold level, celebrating their raft of wildlife-friendly initiatives.

But according to Henry, this is the first time that his parks have rolled out the barrel for bees:

“Many of our holiday home owners and touring guests have a keen interest in nature, and we are always happy to advise how they can play their part in aiding conservation,” said Henry.

“Now we can also point to our own tipple as a way to create a brighter future for bees.

“Every glass raised will help the British Beekeepers Association to educate children about honey bees, and especially their vital role in plant pollination,” he added.

 

Share